Author Topic: More trail etiquette topics  (Read 13209 times)

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Offline Matt

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2012, 10:22:09 AM »
I read no stopping as meaning no stopping in the middle of the trail i.e. stop to the side.  If we couldn't stop I would have died of a heart attack long ago.

Offline Martin

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2012, 10:32:17 AM »
I read no stopping as meaning no stopping in the middle of the trail i.e. stop to the side.  If we couldn't stop I would have died of a heart attack long ago.

in that case, any sign or trail rule should say "get off the trail if you stop", not "no stopping" - although you've got me thinking, should put a "no stopping/standing" sign on the tree at the start of the SMBC climb :-)

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Offline Andrew

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2012, 10:37:37 AM »
Good Point Martin,

But can you please update the rules...

Ie... rule 3. No stopping in the middle of the trail

Offline Martin

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2012, 12:33:36 PM »
Good Point Martin,

But can you please update the rules...

Ie... rule 3. No stopping in the middle of the trail

in your own words...
"DON'T STOP ON TRAILS, etc.. anticipate other trail users around corners / blind spots, prepare to stop if necessary"
it's all about the nuance :-)

i've always thought "don't stop on trials" seems somewhat simplistic
and that part of the rules also tries to remind riders to be aware that there may be someone around the next corner.



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Offline Andrew

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2012, 01:01:08 PM »
Updated for this page

So we make a sign "Rules of the Trail"

1. Ride on Open Trails Only 

2. Leave no Trace (practice low-imapct riding [no skidding!], avoid wet / muddy trails, don't short cut, DON'T LITTER!)

3. Always Yield Trail (be aware of surroundings, let other trail riders know you're coming by calling "track" or "bike", KEEP LEFT, DON'T STOP ON THE MIDDLE OF TRAILS, etc.. anticipate other trail users around corners / blind spots, prepare to stop if necessary)

4. Never scare animals (be aware are respectfull of native animals and horse riders)

5. Plan Ahead (know your bike / equipment, skill level and make sure your are prepared for all types of weather / conditions --- know where you are riding in case of emergency)

6. Emergency (make sure you carry a mobile - call 000 or 112 [on mobile] for emergency

7. Respect other riders (no abusive or aggressive behaviour)

8. Help build and maintain the trails you ride (Lysterfield trails are maintained by volunteers who ride in the park just like you)

9. Have Fun.


please add or modify the "rules" as you see fit

Offline Martin

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2012, 01:12:32 PM »
Updated for this page

So we make a sign "Rules of the Trail"

1. Ride on Open Trails Only 
suggest that people check if trails are open if in doubt

2. Leave no Trace (practice low-imapct riding [no skidding!], avoid wet / muddy trails, don't short cut, DON'T LITTER!)


3. Always Yield Trail (be aware of surroundings, let other trail riders know you're coming by calling "track" or "bike", KEEP LEFT, DON'T STOP ON THE MIDDLE OF TRAILS, etc.. anticipate other trail users around corners / blind spots, prepare to stop if necessary)
not sure how to word it but "if you're stopping to session something, make sure an incoming rider can see you 2 seconds before they would hit you" and generally stay 1-2 metres off the line of the trail if weighing something up/observing/watching/filming/talking (guilty of doing a lot of the last one :-)

4. Never scare animals (be aware are respectfull of native animals and horse riders)

5. Plan Ahead (know your bike / equipment, skill level and make sure your are prepared for all types of weather / conditions --- know where you are riding in case of emergency)

6. Emergency (make sure you carry a mobile - call 000 or 112 [on mobile] for emergency

7. Respect other riders (no abusive or aggressive behaviour)

8. Help build and maintain the trails you ride (Lysterfield trails are maintained by volunteers who ride in the park just like you)

9. Have Fun.


please add or modify the "rules" as you see fit
Mountain bike instruction and coaching: www.dividingrangemtb.com.au

Offline Andrew

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #21 on: April 27, 2012, 01:22:41 PM »
hmmmm
rule 3 seems a bit wordy....
3. Always Yield Trail (be aware of surroundings, let other trail riders know you're coming by calling "track" or "bike", KEEP LEFT, DON'T STOP ON THE MIDDLE OF TRAILS, etc.. anticipate other trail users around corners / blind spots, prepare to stop if necessary)
not sure how to word it but "if you're stopping to session something, make sure an incoming rider can see you 2 seconds before they would hit you" and generally stay 1-2 metres off the line of the trail if weighing something up/observing/watching/filming/talking (guilty of doing a lot of the last one :-)

Offline Kaska

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #22 on: April 27, 2012, 09:04:52 PM »
Some good comments and feedback happening here loving it! I guess the initial trail etiquette list is a bit wordy but it was to encourage everyone to have a think about what should be listed on the final sign. It certainly needs refinement and generally people won't read a sign that is too wordy, some clever design / symbols may help out too??

In terms of 'no stopping on middle of trail' it is a literal meaning. God knows I pull over to the left to catch my breath and have a swig of water regularly (getting old doh!), or have a chat to other riders, or for sessioning out sections of trails (e.g. Follow Me); but I'm talking about riders, say for example the 3 that I saw last Sunday morning, standing in the middle of the track having a chat and didn't give much room for other riders to pass (in both directions). Sometimes you pull over to your left and stop, or slow right down to let faster riders pass, but that is yielding yeah? 

Great stuff guys  ;D

Offline Matt

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #23 on: May 07, 2012, 03:02:38 PM »
Signage definitely required - on Sunday morning I encountered 2 muppets stopped having a chat at the end of the boardwalk on Hug - you could just get through, but not with any speed or decent line choice. 

Offline Brossie (Tim)

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2012, 03:20:05 PM »
Just to clarify, I did mean 'No stopping in the middle of the trail' when I posted that suggestion. Seems like a common sense thing that doesn't even need a sign, but as Matt puts it, some 'Muppets' need the bleeding obvious pointed out to them. And it seems like this is a very common problem.

Maybe we could create some 'Stopping Zones' at some of the fire trail/single track junctions. This may give the less trail educated riders the idea that stopping on the trails is not a good idea. A little bit of signage at these 'Stopping Zones' may encourage riders to read them.
Keep Rollin' Rollin' Rollin.

Offline Andrew

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #25 on: May 07, 2012, 03:52:18 PM »
I think all of this is common sence,
But...
Signs like this from the club foster the correct attitude, and for me, the number one aim of the club is to build a sence of community...

So if you are reading this have a think about what should be on the sign...
At the moment it needs to be refined... ( i am no good at this)

Offline AndrewM

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #26 on: May 07, 2012, 06:25:26 PM »
1. Ride on Open Trails Only

2. Leave no Trace (practice low-imapct riding [no skidding!], avoid wet / muddy trails, don't short cut, DON'T LITTER!)

3. Always Yield Trail ; calling "track" or "bike" to overtake when safe.

4  DON'T STOP ON THE MIDDLE OF TRAILS, Pull off to a visible area to chat or practice sections.

5. Never scare animals (be aware are respectfull of native animals and horse riders)

6. Plan Ahead , know your bike / equipment, skill level and  weather / conditions --- and trail name in case of emergency)

7. Emergency (make sure you carry a mobile - call 000 or 112 [on mobile] for emergency

8. Respect other riders (no abusive or aggressive behaviour)

9. Help build and maintain the trails you ride (Lysterfield trails are maintained by volunteers who ride in the park just like you)

10. Have Fun.

Offline blackshw

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #27 on: May 07, 2012, 07:29:16 PM »
Here's some links which may be of value:


http://www.romp.org/rides/beginnerguide.html
http://bouldermountainbike.org/content/trail-etiquette
http://www.youyangsmtbinc.com.au/trails.html
http://www.webmountainbike.com/nortrailet.html

The last 'webmountainbike' rule is well worded and a good one to close with

The romp one has some good info which could be used to help newbies out too.

Offline doversby (Daz)

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2012, 12:04:44 PM »
Hi all,

Below is direct copy of Forrest website.

I in particular like the part where ridings heading down yield to those "struggling" to ride up.Might minimise my experience with the f###wit on Tuesday night that siad "watch the tree" when I had to yield on narrow track and clipped tree. No Shit Sherlock!!!

?Ride Open Trails: Respect trail and road closures ? ask a land manager for clarification if you are uncertain about the status of a trail. Do not trespass on private land. Obtain permits or other authorization as required. Be aware that bicycles are not permitted in areas protected as state or federal Wilderness.
 ?Leave No Trace: Be sensitive to the dirt beneath you. Wet and muddy trails are more vulnerable to damage than dry ones. When the trail is soft, consider other riding options. This also means staying on existing trails and not creating new ones. Don't cut switchbacks. Be sure to pack out at least as much as you pack in.
 ?Control Your Bicycle: Inattention for even a moment could put yourself and others at risk. Obey all bicycle speed regulations and recommendations, and ride within your limits.
 

?Yield Appropriately: Do your utmost to let your fellow trail users know you're coming ? a friendly greeting or bell ring are good methods. Try to anticipate other trail users as you ride around corners. Bicyclists should yield to other non-motorized trail users, unless the trail is clearly signed for bike-only travel. Bicyclists traveling downhill should yield to ones headed uphill, unless the trail is clearly signed for one-way or downhill-only traffic. In general, strive to make each pass a safe and courteous one.
 ?Never Scare Animals: Animals are easily startled by an unannounced approach, a sudden movement or a loud noise. Give animals enough room and time to adjust to you. When passing horses, use special care and follow directions from the horseback riders (ask if uncertain). Running cattle and disturbing wildlife are serious offenses.
 ?Plan Ahead: Know your equipment, your ability and the area in which you are riding and prepare accordingly. Strive to be self-sufficient: keep your equipment in good repair and carry necessary supplies for changes in weather or other conditions. Always wear a helmet and appropriate safety gear.

Offline Matt

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Re: More trail etiquette topics
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2012, 12:32:25 PM »
I often yield to riders coming uphill, but just as often wonder if it shouldn't be the other way around.  Going downhill you are usually giving it some stick and it totally buggers up your run, versus crawling uphill anyway where it does not impact as much. 

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